Lifestyle

15 Tips to Prepare Your Garden for Winter

Pansy is a good choice for an annual once the weather cools. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Laura McKenzie)

15 Tips to Prepare Your Garden for Winter

Fruit trees protected from freezing temperatures in February at The Gardens at Texas A&M University. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Laura McKenzie)

15 Tips to Prepare Your Garden for Winter

As cooler weather begins around the state, Texans need to start preparing their gardens and yards for the drop in temperatures. A good rule of “green” thumb is the farther north you live in the state, the sooner you need to start preparing.

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Shut Your Mouth

Gone are the days of invincibility. I am no longer under the assumption that I can do all the herculean things. That youth-given naiveness that helps us feel it could never happen to us – that is gone, too. It was replaced by a Murphy’s Law sort of assurance that, if the bad is coming, it surely has me in its sights. So, I worry. I have a PhD. Occasionally, I accept commissioned- based worrying assignments for others. Right now, my specialty is personal worry, but I may branch out to corporate worry soon. It is a trade. Much like a plumber who learned the intricacies of the job from a parent, my mother was a 1st class worrier, too. She fretted over babies taken out in the night air and people who didn’t comb all the knots out of little girl’s hair. But, her specialty was weather worry. That woman could obsess over a dark cloud like nothing you’ve ever seen. My worry work pales in comparison. Lately, I’ve been worried about my health. I worry about cancer recurrences. I worry about heart issues. I worry about future homelessness. I worry about zombies. I worry about snakes. But, mostly, these days, I worry about Alzheimer’s. Am I predestined to suffer the same fate as my mother? Will I forget the faces of the people I love the most? Will I slowly lose the ability to drive, to walk, to talk? And, can I stop it?

Ask Aunt B

B Dear Aunt B, Thanksgiving and then Christmas is coming. UGH. I know you have talked about this before, but it still exists for me. I DONT LIKE HOLIDAYS. I really do think there is something wrong with me. Help!!!!!

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Is it Live or is it Memorex?

It was the mid 80s. I was a Junior at Seagoville High School, where a night out on the town meant a slushie at the brand-new Sonic and a nice cruise through the Minyard’s parking lot. We didn’t have a movie theater. We didn’t have a bowling alley. There was no country club, no arcade. When the night fell, we just drove. We cruised. One afternoon, as the school day was ending, I sensed excitement in the air. “Are you going?” a friend asked. “Wanna ride with us?” she said. I answered, “Go where? To Sonic?” “Eww, as if,” was her response. “Don’t you even know? They’re filming a movie. We’re all gonna go watch. It’s Chuck Freaking Norris.” Yes, Chuck was filming right outside of town, smack dab in the gravel pits. Have you ever seen a gravel pit? The pits of my childhood still exist. Right on Malloy Bridge Road, as you’re leaving Seagoville and heading toward Wilmer, massive mountains of gravel stand, ready to be loaded into dump trucks and taken hither and yon. From river rock to road base to crushed limestone to rip rap to pea gravel, these Grand Canyon wannabes stand tall and proud, lining this industrial area for miles on both sides of the road. Heck, most of us learned how to swim in the deep basins of water that gather in between the tall stacks of rocks. Pits are excavated in aquifers, like these gravel pits next to the Trinity River, where groundwater quickly fills them, creating ponds up to 400 ft deep. Sounds heavenly until the first time you spot a den of water moccasins or take a misstep from a 4 ft depth into a neverending hole. You’re probably wondering what drew Chuck Norris to the Seagoville gravel pits. The answer is, duh, the Middle East. As best I can tell, the movie was Delta Force. The plot shows a Lebanon setting, released in 1986, which would line up with production/filming around ’84 or ’85. Though this 5-movie dynasty would earn millions, this first installment was anything but a sure deal. And, why go to the Middle East when you can just come to a gravel pit in a rural Southeast Dallas area that has lots of sand and things that look like pyramids? We sat in a ditch at the edge of the road and watched people stand around all night long. There was a man running around with a kaffiyeh on his head that everyone said was Chuck Norris. Eventually, they blew up some gravel and we all went home. But, they weren’t in the Middle East. They were fooling the audience. And here’s the deal, it happens all the time.

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Forney Messenger

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 936, Forney, TX 75126
Physical Address: 201 W. Broad St., Forney, TX 75126
Phone: 972-564-3121
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