News

Forney Police Make Arrest in Stolen Puppy Case

Forney Police Make Arrest in Stolen Puppy Case

On Tuesday, July 13th, 2021, at around 10:30 pm, Forney Police Officers responded to a parking lot in the 800 block of US HWY 80 for a reported aggravated robbery. Victims told officers they were meeting someone there to sell a puppy and were robbed at gunpoint. The suspect vehicle was reported as being a tan Toyota Camry with paper tags occupied by three individuals. During the transaction, the puppy was taken and when the owner tried to retrieve it, one of the individuals displayed a gun. They left with the puppy and were seen head-ing west towards Mesquite. The suspects were described as Hispanic males in their late teens or early twenties.

Authorities Respond to Two Murders in Four Days

Authorities Respond to Two Murders in Four Days

On Wednesday, July 21, 2021, Kaufman County Sheriff’s Office and Kaufman County Constable, Precinct 2, responded to a call reporting a shooting in the Travis Ranch community, located northwest of the City of Forney. At approximately 4:45pm, law enforcement officers arrived to find a deceased male on San Antonio Drive who was later identified as 34-year-old Jeremy Carter of Mesquite. Following the release of several photos and videos of persons of interest in the investigation, two men surrendered to Kaufman County Sheriff’s Office Saturday morning. Antonio Dewayne Bowens, 17, and Markuevis Bowens, 20, were arrested after turning themselves in and were subsequently charged with murder. Bonds for both men have been set at $1,000,000 each. Korwin Brown, 18, was also arrested on July 26 in connection with the shooting and charged with murder. At the time of press, bond had not been set.

Texas A&M AgriLife Team Seeking ‘holy grail’ of Tomatoes

Texas A&M AgriLife Research breeders are working toward developing the “holy grail” of tomatoes. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Kay Ledbetter)

Texas A&M AgriLife Team Seeking ‘holy grail’ of Tomatoes

Carlos Avila, Ph.D. Texas A&M AgriLife Research vegetable breeder. (Texas A&M Agrilife photo)

Texas A&M AgriLife Team Seeking ‘holy grail’ of Tomatoes

The new TAM-SP18-157 line should benefit Texas producers in a similar way as other Texas A&M AgriLife-led vegetable improvements. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo)

Texas A&M AgriLife Team Seeking ‘holy grail’ of Tomatoes

A proposed project involving the characterization of a new breeding line of tomatoes developed by the Texas A&M AgriLife breeding program at Weslaco could further enhance Texas’ reputation for growing exceptional produce, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists.

Exercising Safely After Recovering from COVID-19

Exercising Safely After Recovering from COVID-19

The number of people who have been infected by the novel coronavirus COVID-19 is difficult to determine, as millions of people may have had the virus but been asymptomatic. But as of April 2021, the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University reported that more than 31 million people in the United States have had confirmed coronavirus infections, and Canada reported 1,087,158 confirmed cases with 80,204 considered active at that time. Thousands of new cases are reported daily nationwide, and many others have occurred around the world.

Fascinating Facts About Wasps, Hornets

Paper wasps tending to their nest inside a barn. Note the abandoned paper nest and remnant outline of a mud dauber structure nearby. Texas A&M AgriLife (photo by Adam Russell)

Fascinating Facts About Wasps, Hornets

Murder hornets may make the headlines because of their frightening name, but they are not in Texas. So, let’s talk about wasps and hornets and precautions you can take to avoid stings.

Who is Footing the Bill for Texas Democrats’ Weekslong Exodus to Block the Voting Bill?

Private charter planes at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport on July 12, 2021. Democratic lawmakers booked charter flights to leave the state in protest of Republican-led voting restriction legislation. Credit: Jordan Vonderhaar for The Texas Tribune

Who is Footing the Bill for Texas Democrats’ Weekslong Exodus to Block the Voting Bill?

As Texas House Democrats settle in for a potentially weekslong stay in the nation’s capital, one question is becoming increasingly relevant: Who’s footing the bill?

Choo Choo Ch’Boogie
Choo Choo Ch’Boogie

Choo Choo Ch’Boogie

In 1875, Henry Boston opened a general store right off of Lake Road, in picturesque Washington State, near the modern-day border of the Idaho panhandle. He built a house on Lake Creek. He hoped to capitalize on the fact that people need water to survive. A store doesn’t hurt, either. He took the old “if I build it they will come” approach. Records show the store survived only 3 years. While additional info on old Hank is sparse, these meager beginnings do make for one heckofa story, because by 1878, someone else would swoop into the not quite a town and, as the young folks say, blow people’s minds. William H. Marshall swooped faster than the indigenous bald eagles of the Pacific Northwest. Within 2 years, he built a home, damned a river, opened a sawmill, named a town, created a post office, and appointed himself as postmaster and town namesake. Welcome to Marshall, WA. Personally, I think he had inside info. Coincidentally, or not, by May, the Northern Pacific Railroad came a calling, and the tracks started flying. By 1902, NPRR was joined by the SPS&R – Spokane, Portland, & Seattle Railway Company. That’s quite a bit of track laying, eh? Why, who’s going to do it? Imagine Mr. Marshall saying this. “Hey guys! I have a great idea. You know that little convict camp down the road? It’s over there by ‘Marshall Creek’ (1910 air quotes) where they crush the rocks for building the roads. Let’s turn it into a state prison farm. Yeah, I know, right? The prisoners can crush the rock, AND, we can lease the rest out to dynamite factories.” And, that is what they did. But the railroad ties, that would be tricky. For this volume of wood, they were going to need to tap on the St. Joe National Forest, east of Palouse. To get those logs up to Marshall, they would need another railway – the Washington, Idaho, & Montana Railway. But, wait, we’re here to talk about the 306.

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Coats School

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Cedar School, 1938

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Forney Public School, 1903-1939

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Independence Consolidated School #3, 1925-26

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Forney High School, 1923-1983

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Rand School

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Kemp’s Third School

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Kemp High School

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Phoenix High School

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Kaufman Grammar School, 1894-1901

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Scurry-Rosser Rural High School, 1929-30

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Lewis Academy, 1893-1903

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Girls’ Dormitory of Lewis Academy

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Mrs. Westley’s Kindergarden

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

St. Martin’s Academy

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

Forney Sanitarium and Training School

More KAUFMAN COUNTY area OLD SCHOOLS

(1 Coats School—located on today’s University Drive; 2nd one built 1926—seesaws, slides, merry-goround, swings on tall, metal pipes with ropes…..This school may have been the “Lodge” building that for a long time sat on Old Hwy. 80 a little before Prairie View Cemetery.

Texas Vineyards Endure Rough Growing Season

Vineyards around the state faced a wild range of Texas weather from freezing temperatures and ice to bouts of drought and torrential rains during the 2021 growing season. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Sam Craft)

Texas Vineyards Endure Rough Growing Season

Erratic weather dealt Texas vineyards a difficult growing season as the industry continues to recover from pandemic-related setbacks, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts.

Pages

Forney Messenger

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 936, Forney, TX 75126
Physical Address: 201 W. Broad St., Forney, TX 75126
Phone: 972-564-3121
Fax: 972-552-3599